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Wonderful Architectural design in the world

8 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed architecture

From Zaha Hadid’s majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry’s Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in

Completed in 2006, the dynamic extension to the <a class=Denver Art Museum came courtesy of Daniel Libeskind, one of the most revolutionary architects in the world. Inspired by the surrounding Rocky Mountains, as well as the growth of Denver as a city, Libeskind’s sharp angular forms have attracted more museumgoers since they were added."/>

Denver Art Museum, by Daniel Libeskind (Denver, Colorado)

Completed in 2006, the dynamic extension to the Denver Art Museum came courtesy of Daniel Libeskind, one of the most revolutionary architects in the world. Inspired by the surrounding Rocky Mountains, as well as the growth of Denver as a city, Libeskind’s sharp angular forms have attracted more museumgoers since they were added.

Zaha Hadid’s iconic <a class=Phaeno Science Center is much like the natural world itself, full of mystery and discovery. Completed in 2005, the space is an interactive science center. The building, which is made of concrete and glass, stands on stilts, allowing the public to pass through. Whether the structure was meant to take the shape of a whale, or some other object, is difficult to say. What’s for certain is that the design altered Wolfburg’s built environment—so much so that a year later it was awarded the RIBA European Award."/>

Phaeno Science Center, by Zaha Hadid (Wolfsburg, Germany)

Zaha Hadid’s iconic Phaeno Science Center is much like the natural world itself, full of mystery and discovery. Completed in 2005, the space is an interactive science center. The building, which is made of concrete and glass, stands on stilts, allowing the public to pass through. Whether the structure was meant to take the shape of a whale, or some other object, is difficult to say. What’s for certain is that the design altered Wolfburg’s built environment—so much so that a year later it was awarded the RIBA European Award.

Phaeno Science Center, by Zaha Hadid (Wolfsburg, Germany)

Zaha Hadid’s iconic Phaeno Science Center is much like the natural world itself, full of mystery and discovery. Completed in 2005, the space is an interactive science center. The building, which is made of concrete and glass, stands on stilts, allowing the public to pass through. Whether the structure was meant to take the shape of a whale, or some other object, is difficult to say. What’s for certain is that the design altered Wolfburg’s built environment—so much so that a year later it was awarded the RIBA European Award.

Perhaps no stadium in the world is as attenion-grabbing as Beijing’s National Stadium. Built in 2007 to host the 2008 Summer Olympics and Paralympics, the arena deconstructs the traditional notion of what a sports venue could be. Designed by Herzog and de Meuron and Ai Weiwei, the nest-like steel not only supports the structure but also has the organic feel of something created by nature itself.

National Stadium, by Herzog and de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (Beijing, China)

Perhaps no stadium in the world is as attenion-grabbing as Beijing’s National Stadium. Built in 2007 to host the 2008 Summer Olympics and Paralympics, the arena deconstructs the traditional notion of what a sports venue could be. Designed by Herzog and de Meuron and Ai Weiwei, the nest-like steel not only supports the structure but also has the organic feel of something created by nature itself.

The Netherlands’ Groninger Museum is like no other art museum in the world, primarily due to its irregular design. The redesign (pictured) was completed in 2011 by the Italian architect Alessandro Mendini, with other additions to the renovations coming courtesy of by Philippe Starck and Coop Himmelb(l)au. The <a href="https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/van-gogh-painting-stolen-from-dutch-museum-on-his-birthday?mbid=synd_yahoo_rss" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:museum made news" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">museum made news</a> in March, when a painting from its permanent collection by Vincent Van Gogh was stolen while on loan at the Singer Laren Museum near Amsterdam.

The Groninger Museum, by Alessandro Mendini (Groningen, Netherlands)

The Netherlands’ Groninger Museum is like no other art museum in the world, primarily due to its irregular design. The redesign (pictured) was completed in 2011 by the Italian architect Alessandro Mendini, with other additions to the renovations coming courtesy of by Philippe Starck and Coop Himmelb(l)au. The museum made news in March, when a painting from its permanent collection by Vincent Van Gogh was stolen while on loan at the Singer Laren Museum near Amsterdam.

Completed in 2009 in Rome, Zaha Hadid’s MAXXI is the first Italian public museum devoted to contemporary arts and architecture. The building coils and turns like a snake, providing visitors moments of architectural surprise on all sides of the structure. Hadid’s design was selected in an international competition, beating out 273 competing bids. The Iraqi-born architect often used to say, “There are 359 other degrees, why limit yourself to one?” Visitors to Rome can see that creed displayed at the MAXXI.

MAXXI, by Zaha Hadid Architects (Rome, Italy)

Completed in 2009 in Rome, Zaha Hadid’s MAXXI is the first Italian public museum devoted to contemporary arts and architecture. The building coils and turns like a snake, providing visitors moments of architectural surprise on all sides of the structure. Hadid’s design was selected in an international competition, beating out 273 competing bids. The Iraqi-born architect often used to say, “There are 359 other degrees, why limit yourself to one?” Visitors to Rome can see that creed displayed at the MAXXI.

Standing across the street from the beautiful <a href="https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/buildings-redefined-architecture-past-5-years?mbid=synd_yahoo_rss" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Broad Museum by New York–based DS+R" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Broad Museum by New York–based DS+R</a> is Frank Gehry’s monumental Walt Disney Concert Hall. Located in downtown L.A. and completed in 2003, the building reflects light that appear to rise and fall, like the musical notes from any Disney soundtrack.

ehry (Los Angeles, California)

Standing across the street from the beautiful Broad Museum by New York–based DS+R is Frank Gehry’s monumental Walt Disney Concert Hall. Located in downtown L.A. and completed in 2003, the building reflects light that appear to rise and fall, like the musical notes from any Disney soundtrack.

Perhaps no form mimics the potential of deconstructed architecture than Peter Eisenman’s masterpiece, the City of Culture of Galicia. The series of buildings takes up a wide expanse that rolls in the same way a mountain range would. Visitors outside of the building are free to walk up and down the rooftop (when the incline is not too steep); while inside, visitors have an abundance of natural light from the floor-to-ceiling windows.

City of Culture of Galicia, by Peter Eisenman (Galicia, Spain)

Perhaps no form mimics the potential of deconstructed architecture than Peter Eisenman’s masterpiece, the City of Culture of Galicia. The series of buildings takes up a wide expanse that rolls in the same way a mountain range would. Visitors outside of the building are free to walk up and down the rooftop (when the incline is not too steep); while inside, visitors have an abundance of natural light from the floor-to-ceiling windows.

Deconstructing many of Daniel Libeskind’s designs is like breaking down a symphony; the many moving parts will move any critic toward appreciation. Built in 2002, and the first building in the U.K. designed by the Polish-born architect, the structure looks, at first, like a simple mash of forms. But looks can be deceiving. Libeskind’s design for the war museum serves to deconstruct the globe itself, reattaching its many parts in fractured form.

Imperial War Museum North, by Daniel Libeskind (Manchester, England)

Deconstructing many of Daniel Libeskind’s designs is like breaking down a symphony; the many moving parts will move any critic toward appreciation. Built in 2002, and the first building in the U.K. designed by the Polish-born architect, the structure looks, at first, like a simple mash of forms. But looks can be deceiving. Libeskind’s design for the war museum serves to deconstruct the globe itself, reattaching its many parts in fractured form.


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