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Benefits Of Drinking Coconut Water During Pregnancy

Check out some of the benefits that you may get from drinking coconut water during pregnancy.According to the Mayo Clinic, Coconut water is not water with coconut flavor added. It's the clear fluid inside the coconut, not to be confused with coconut milk, "which is an emulsion of coconut water and fresh grated coconut. So coconut water is a type of juice." the May Clinic also suggests that coconut water is much lower in sugar and in calories than typical juices. The most popular reason that people drink coconut water is to they think it is going to help rehydrate after physical activity or illnesses that may cause dehydration like stomach flu and diarrhea. Coconut water has " natural electrolytes — such as potassium, sodium, and manganese — but amounts can vary due to changes that occur in coconut water as the coconut matures." Although it may appear that coconut water is very effective in rehydrating, there is evidence that drinking coconut water is no more effective than drinking regular water.

Healthline explains the benefits of coconut water. Coconut water is the juice that is found in the center of a young, green coconut. It helps nourish the fruit. As the coconut matures then the juice remains liquid and the rest of the coconut will become riper and will become harder. The water that forms inside the coconut is not to be confused with coconut milk. Coconut was is natural and contains very little fat and consists of 94% water. While coconut milk is when coconut water is mixed with grated coconut meat. There are many different recipes that can help you make your own coconut milk.


It is important to know that there are a lot of myths about drinking coconut water. You may think that it can help boost your immune system, help you avoid urinary tract infections, or help your baby be more intelligent. Although healthy, coconut water isn't a magic drink that will cure all of your ailments.

Myths About Coconut Water

  • Coconut water will help with the health of the baby's skin and hair: The health of the baby's skin color is not going to be altered by coconut water and will depend on genetic factors.
  • Coconut water provides all of the nutrients you may need: This is not true. There is no one thing on the Earth that provides somebody with all of the nutrients that they need to be healthy.
  • Coconut water should replace regular water during pregnancy: Andrea Giancoli, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietitics, to take a deeper look at coconut water. "In the past few years, coconut water has just exploded on the health scene,” says Giancoli. “It definitely has that health halo around it.” But while it's certainly trendy, in most cases, you’re probably just as well off drinking from the tap. “Whenever a new miracle cure comes around, we tend to think if we just eat -- or drink -- enough of that one thing, it will cure all that ails us,” says Giancoli. "However, rather than guzzling a Tahitian island’s worth of the stuff, you’re better off sticking to a balanced diet."
  • It has electrolytes so it can replace sports drinks: The reason sports drinks, such as Gatorade, was created was to provide athlete electrolytes. Cedars-Sinaiclinical dietitians Erika Der Sarkissian and Christina Fasulo talk about electrolytes. They said, " They do a lot in the body. They regulate muscle contractions and keep you hydrated. Electrolytes also help balance your pH levels (the measure of acidity and alkalinity). And they control nervous-system function." After a heavy workout, it is important to refuel those electrolytes and many choose sports drinks. However, coconut water has been suspected to do the same as sports drinks, but it probably is not the same. According to WebMD, "Like most leading sports drinks, coconut water contains sugar and electrolytes, though it’s lower in both calories and sodium, key facts when it comes to rehydration. “If you’re doing a workout that’s longer than an hour, coconut water may not give you what you need to replace what you’ve lost,” says Giancoli. Same goes for working out in very hot weather."

There are many benefits of drinking coconut water, especially for pregnant women who need more water and more nutrients in their diets.

  • Help with Nausea: The number one reason some women have turned to coconut water is that they claim it has helped with their morning sickness and their overall nausea.
  • One Cup of Coconut water has a lot of nutrients and health benefits according to Healthline. Carbs: 9 grams, Fiber: 3 grams, Protein: 2 grams, Vitamin C: 10% of the RDI, Magnesium: 15% of the RDI, Manganese: 17% of the RDI, Potassium: 17% of the RDI, Sodium: 11% of the RDI, Calcium: 6% of the RDI
  • Antioxidant Properties:According to Healthline, "Free radicals are unstable molecules produced in your cells during metabolism. Their production increases in response to stress or injury. When there are too many free radicals, your body enters a state of oxidative stress, which can damage your cells and increase disease risk." Animal research that was studied on rats showed that animals that were given coconut water had modified free radicals.
  • Good amount of Potassium: Coconut water offers a large dose of certain nutrients. “It’s especially rich in potassium,” says Giancoli, “And potassium is something that a lot of us don’t get enough of since we don’t eat enough fruits or vegetables.” However, there are a lot of other things that you eat that will provide you with the necessary potassium. “Bananas are common in our diets,” she says, “but potatoes actually have more. They’re a potassium powerhouse.”

WebMD explains, "As for how coconut water stacks up to trusty old H20, a study found that when comparing coconut water to plain water and a rehydration drink, all three provided adequate rehydration. However, blood sugar levels were restored faster with coconut water, which contains natural sugar, and the rehydration drink than with water." Gianocli explains what is recommended for a work out that isn't very difficult. She says that if you work out for an hour or less than you do not need to have a sports drink replacement because you have not become in danger of losing too many electrolytes. "For the casual exerciser, drinking water is enough. If you find that you’re hungry afterward, drink water and eat something," explains Giancoli. "Coconut water can also tide you over if you're hungry but don't have food on hand. But be warned: If you’re exercising more than an hour, coconut water may not be enough [to replace what you've lost],” says Giancoli.


In conclusion, coconut water is not going to be bad for you or your health. Do not drink coconut water because you think that it is going to provide you with all of the things for a healthy pregnancy. It is a good drink to have that can possibly provide you with some nutrients and help quench your thirst with some added electrolytes.

Content created and supplied by: Chris_B (via Opera News )

Coconut May Clinic Mayo Clinic

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