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10 Habits You Should Avoid Doing After 40 to Reduce Your Chances of Getting a Heart Attack

It's especially crucial to be aware of your risk of heart attack as you become older. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease is the leading cause of mortality in both men and women around the world, accounting for one out of every four fatalities in the United States. Unfortunately, while certain things improve as you get older, your heart health is not usually one of them. There's still time to break the behaviours that raise your heart attack risk beyond 40 if you don't want to become a statistic. Make changes now to ensure that you have many years of good health ahead of you.

1. Getting angry

We've always been accused of losing our cool now and again, but it's in your best advantage to attempt to control how frequently you lose your cool. According to a 2015 research reported in the European Cardiovascular Journal, regular sentiments of anger are connected to an increased risk of heart attack. The study's authors discovered that periods of extreme rage were connected to a higher risk of acute cardiac occlusion, a condition in which blood flow to the heart is obstructed.

2. Not eating breakfast

Starting your day off correctly with a healthy breakfast might save your life in the long run. Breakfast consumption was linked to a lower risk of coronary heart disease, according to an analysis of evidence published in the british journal Circulation in 2013.

3. Not being able to handle stress

Your daily pressures, ranging from terrible relationships to lengthy work hours, could have major consequences for your heart health. Chronic stress that lasts for a long time raises cortisol levels and causes an inflammatory response in the body. Long-term stress also weakens the immune system, allowing heart disease to develop.

4. Failure to floss

Your oral and cardiovascular health are more intertwined than you may realize. Oral bacteria, according to a 2016 study released in the BMJ Postgraduate Scientific Journal, can heighten the risk of atherosclerosis, or the hardening and constriction of arteries, which can greatly increase the chance of a heart attack.

5. Going to work every day with car

Consider bicycling to work whenever necessary if you want to improve your heart health. People who commuted to work by bicycle or foot had a lesser chance of obesity and lower blood pressure, which suggests a lower risk of heart attack, according to study in the journal Archives of Medical Science in 2009.

6. Not getting vaccinated against the flu

The virus will do more than eat up your sick days; it may also increase your chance of a possibly catastrophic cardiovascular incident. Patients had a considerably elevated heart attack risk during the first 7 days following a confirmed flu diagnosis, as shown in a 2018 study released in The British Medical Journal. All the more reason to be vaccinated against the flu! 

7. Keep an eye on your blood sugar levels

It's time to start checking your sugar levels if you're over 40, particularly if you have a family history of the disease or health conditions like obesity, high blood pressure, or a sedentary lifestyle. Sugars accumulate in the bloodstream, raising your risk of heart disease. Blood sugar levels can be lowered by eating a nutritious diet, exercising regularly, and consuming whole food plant-based nutrition. 

8. Not working out at all

Skipping the gym a few times could cause serious heart problems in the future. Physical inactivity is linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Physical activity also helps you control your blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, and even degree of stress, thereby lowering your risk of a heart attack. So, how much time do you think you should spend at the fitness centre? Experts say that 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day—or 150 minutes per week—reduces your risk of heart disease. 

9. Smoking

If you're a smoker, now is the time to stop. Smoking raises a person's risk of heart disease, along with high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke.

10. Excessive caffeine consumption

While a cup of coffee now and then is unlikely to harm you, a caffeine addiction can raise your risk of heart attack. Caffeine use that is excessive increases to stress in the body, which can increase the risk of heart disease.

At 40, you should engage in every healthy activity that will improve your health and make you fit. This way, there will be a very reduced chance of you getting any heart disease, not to talk of heart attack. 

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention European Cardiovascular Journal United States

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