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In Islam, a woman’s money belongs only to her while a man is obligated to spend on his wife

In Islam, a woman’s money belongs only to her while a man is obligated to spend his money on his wife and children. In fact, a Muslim man isn’t allowed to ask a woman for money – but she may offer to share her wealth. This is considered fair as men are entitled to a higher inheritance and may be the breadwinner in their families. However, in 21st century society, it’s seldom possible to survive on one income. So, many households run on the financial offerings of both partners. For the most part though, men are expected to cover expenses.

Muslim men open up about the financial strain of extravagant weddings View 30 comments Big weddings are the cause of lots of financial hardship (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk) Share this article via facebookShare this article via twitter 8k SHARES Faima Bakar Saturday 30 Nov 2019 3:30 pm In Islam, a woman’s money belongs only to her while a man is obligated to spend his money on his wife and children. In fact, a Muslim man isn’t allowed to ask a woman for money – but she may offer to share her wealth. This is considered fair as men are entitled to a higher inheritance and may be the breadwinner in their families. However, in 21st century society, it’s seldom possible to survive on one income. So, many households run on the financial offerings of both partners. For the most part though, men are expected to cover expenses. TOP ARTICLES 1/5 Can you still get deliveries in time for Mother’s Day amid coronavirus chaos? For some, that comes with difficulties, such as taking out loans, borrowing from their families and asking their partner for help, which some find ’embarrassing’. As part of money and debt month on Metro.co.uk, we asked men from the Muslim community about what it’s like to shoulder the majority of financial responsibilities. We want to demystify the taboos of earning and spending while showing that though money problems can be alienating, you are not alone in your struggles. And while Muslim men may find it difficult to fulfill their Islamic obligation, which includes paying a mahr (a gift from the groom to the bride), many others are in a similar situation. After speaking to some Muslim men, there is one common factor being blamed for accruing debt: large weddings. Though most agree that extravagant weddings have become a cultural norm, not a religious one, they often find themselves succumbing to pressure, resulting in precarious financial situations. Here is what five men said about their financial hardship… Numan, 32 ‘My main issue is with large expensive weddings. At my wedding, we spent about £55,000 between both parties. We both felt the financial strain and my in-laws had to borrow money from the banks. ‘A big wedding doesn’t just put financial strains on the relationship during the wedding, it also affects it afterward. ‘For people with an average income, it’s a huge pressure. It depends, person to person. If you are an immigrant, then you’re worse off. ‘I have to pay off my debts, run my family here plus help my family back home and at the same time pay loads of money to the UK Border Agency for my citizenship.

‘My wife and I try to stick to our Islamic values. At the same time, we also share the load of the family in a sensible manner. ‘We both know it’s pretty difficult to live on just my salary, so she is always more than happy to contribute. ‘It’s not fair on her to contribute to our family expenses “equally”. Our salaries aren’t the same, so why should we contribute the same amount? Hence we each contribute towards our combined expenses against the ratio of our earnings. ‘If I could do my wedding all over again, I would skim it down to just the bare minimum. I would have a very intimate and close ceremony that I can afford without taking any loan.

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Ella Byworth Islam Metro.co.uk Muslim

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